Shooting Food

People often ask me why I enjoy shooting food so much. Depending on how I feel, I have different answers but this sums it up:

I never knew I would share such a close relationship with food.

In 2013, I couldn’t scramble an egg if you asked me to. It wasn’t a part of my lifestyle. I relied on my cooks in India to prepare my meals and as some of you may know, it’s standard practice to have someone to cook for you in India or Africa. Back in Vancouver, I’d just eat out.

When I moved to Toronto around a year ago, I wanted to live better and that also meant I needed to eat better. There is only way to do that. I had to cook my own food and add some diversity to the food that I ate whenever I was out.

If you’re learning to cook, eating out can be a very informative experience.

So I played with my restaurant choices and after 43 unique restaurant visits, there is one thing I brought back to my own kitchen.

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It could have been a conversation with a chef towards his/her approach or paying more attention to the ingredients/description of a particular meal but what I love most about eating out is the presentation. It’s that last step that truly summarizes the effort that has been placed into the food that has been presented in front of you.

I feel that the attention to the way food is plated and presented is often overlooked. For some reason, most people don’t pay much attention to the way they plate their food at home but a part of me wants to bring that experience home. So I tried.

It’s not easy to plate something the way restaurants do but occasionally, I’d get pretty close. I wanted to learn how to do this so I took a course in food photography and styling.

I didn’t do it because of the photography at first. I had no interest in shooting food but as I become more comfortable with the styling of food, I couldn’t resist grabbing my camera.

It was around this time I booked my first food client, Nugateau Patisserie Inc. They produce the finest éclairs in Toronto and Chef Atul Thomas invests a lot of attention into each éclair they produce. They're challenging to shoot but I love them.

My experience with food has been unique and if you’re reading this, I hope you can share a similar experience.

I want to shoot the things that matter the most in life and for me, those things are the people in my life and the food that gives us life.